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20121027
20121104
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government is here, we're doing what we need to do, coordinating with fema and i thank you mr. fugate for being here and helping our operation even better and we will move on from here. what i said yesterday i really mean. there has got to be sorrow and you see that and the president's seen that today, in the eyes and the faces of a lot of the folks he's met and that sorrow is appropriate. we've suffered some loss. luckily we haven't suffered that much loss of life and we thank god for that but we have suffered losses and this is the worst storm that i've seen in my lifetime in this state, but we cannot permit that sorrow to replace the resilience i know all new jerseyians have so we will get up and we'll get this thing rebuilt and we'll put things back together, because that's what this state is all about and always has been all about, and so for all of you who are here and i met a bunch of you today at brigantine who d disregarded my admonition to get the hell out of here. you are forgiven this time but not for much longer. we have to make sure when all of you see all this destructi
and by mi making sure that fema performs well and the entire federal bureaucracy responds officially, he gets points. he looks like a leader. he looks like someone in command. that's always good for undecided voters. it's always good to motivate someone in his base who wasn't sure they were going to vote. secondly, if you subscribe to the theory that the romney campaign had momentum t looked like it did in some of the swing states. this is a timeout for three days. it's like a basketball game where one side is coming back from being way down and they're only two buoyapoints down. all the sudden the scoreboard clock goes down. for ten minutes they repair the clock. after that, the team has lost its momentum. i think the guy that had momentum is hurt by a three-day layoff. thirdly, there's a fundamental distinction between the two campaigns and two visions. one says that government should get out of the way and let the private sector do its job. one, the president's campaign, said government's important. at a time like this, people are reminded as clearly and as graphically as they can be
to be extensive damage from a financial point of view, which federal government through fema, federal emergency management agency, et cetera, ultimately winds up paying for. state and locals pay a portion of it. but it's a small portion. i don't believe that's going to have a significant impact long term. the expenses diffused. it's not good for state and local governments because we're already under a lot of pressure but i think that's going to be manageable. and i don't think it's going to have a major impact. i just -- your question earlier on when do the markets get up and running and is there a delay, i think if there's an economic impact, that would be it. that's why the white house is concerned. i'm going to be reaching out to secretary geithner to make sure we're coordinated to everything we can to get wall street everything it needs to be operational as soon as possible. >> and your power just went out. we're expecting widespread power outages once sandy does hit landfall. is that an accurate statement? i mean, will things get worse from here? >> things will get worse. i'm in a militar
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3